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UCSF Communicators Network Resources

Use of the UCSF logo and UC seal

May students use the UCSF logo or the UC seal on publications they create?

Student use of official logos or seals not permitted

No, students may not use the UCSF logo or the UC seal on publications they create. Use of University seals, logos, and other identity elements are regulated under California Education Code 92000, by trademark law, and by University policy.

Students can use "at UCSF"

In general, UCSF endorses the use of "at UCSF" in the name of registered campus organizations rather than the University logo because use of the logo implies an official sanction.

Registered campus organizations or individual students working on projects can specify "[organization name] at UCSF" in a headline or in body text, but they may not use UCSF logos, UCSF official typeface families (Bodoni and Helvetica Neue), or anything which attempts to resemble UCSF logos.

Use of the official 2-level logo with tag line or the University of California seal is reserved for official campus use only.

Not Permitted

Permitted

Notes

UCSF Footbag Club

Footbag Club at UCSF

"UCSF Footbag Club" incorrectly implies that the University officially sanctions the Footbag Club. "Footbag Club at UCSF" more clearly connotes that Footbag Club is not sanctioned by the University while still expressing the group's involvement with the University.

Footbag Club with UC seal

Footbag Club

The UC seal may not be used by registered campus organizations or individual student projects. The typeface in these examples, Myriad Pro, is similar to the UCSF official typeface of Helvetica Neue, but it is not exactly the same, so using this typeface is permitted.

Footbag Club with UCSF logo

Footbag Club at UCSF

In this example, both Footbag Club logos correctly specify "at UCSF" after the name of the organization, but using an official UCSF typeface is not permitted, and using the UCSF logo is not permitted.

Images above that include the footbag person silhouette were adapted under Creative Commons license from Footbag Players by Flickr/x-hibit. These images are shared alike under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

May faculty and staff use the UCSF logo or the UC seal on publications they create?

Outside of official University business

Faculty and staff acting outside of official University business may use the UCSF logo or the UC seal no differently than members of the press whose use is restricted by copyright and trademark law.

Within official University business

Yes, faculty and staff may use the UCSF logo or UC seal for official University business within the scope of an individual's employment. However, this use is not unrestricted.

Faculty, staff, and hired contractors are required by University policy to follow the usage guidelines provided below.

Professional services

Paper products

  • business cards
  • letterhead
  • envelopes
  • other office stationery

Contact Documents & Media.

Computer support

For help inserting images into documents, contact your computer support team.

Design

To get professional results with graphic and web design, hire:

  • Documents & Media
  • your own professional designer (and provide him or her with the URL for this page)

Guidelines

Visual Identity Standards cover Visual Identity Standards page 22 Visual Identity Standards page 23

For using UCSF logos: See Brand Logos.

Logos and seals

UC

UC seal, black UC seal, white

  • just the seal in black and white
  • EMF, EPS, JPEG, PNG, TIFF

uc.zip, 4.1 MB, 10 items

UCSF

UCSF logo signature with tagline UCSF logo signature without tagline UCSF logo

  • black, white, and navy
  • logo, logo with signature, logo with signature and tagline
  • EPS, JPG, PNG

See Downloads.

May members of the press use the UCSF logo or the UC seal?

Yes, but as with any logo that is not your own, your use is restricted by copyright and trademark law. To obtain UCSF logos and the UC seal, see Downloads.

Use of University seals, logos, and other identity elements are regulated under California Education Code 92000, by trademark law, and by University policy.